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Fertilizer News

Restocking of Fused Magnesium Phosphate Fertilizer

We are pleased to inform that we restock our Fused Magnesium Phosphate Fertilizer (FMP). We are sharing the look of the new packaging of the FMP.

Front Look of the Bag

Back look of the bag

Feel free to be in touch with us on the FMP at

Everchem Corporation (M) Sdn Bhd

25-1, 1 Mont Kiara, No 1 Jalan Kiara, Mont Kiara, 50480 Kuala Lumpur

Or call us at P: +603 6201 7435 or email us at info@everchem.com.my

Unloading of Ulexite and collection of composite sample

Below are the activity by Everchem Corporation on the unloading of Ulexite and being inspected and composite sample collection exercise by SGS Malaysia.

CONTAINER LOCK BEING IDENTIFIED BY SGS MALAYSIA

OPENING THE CONTAINER

UNLOADING OF ULEXITE FROM THE CONTAINER

SGS MALAYSIA’S AUDITOR

COMPOSITE SAMPLES BEING COLLECTED

COMPOSITE SAMPLES COLLECTED

SEALING THE ULEXITE BAG

TOTAL NUMBER OF ULEXITE BAGS UNLOADED

ARRIVAL OF THE CONTAINER

UNLOADING OF ULEXITE BAGS FROM THE CONTAINER

SAMPLE GATHERING EXERCISE

New FMP’s bag marking

We are pleased to present our new Fused Magnesium Phosphate (FMP) bag marking. Listed is the process of receiving our cargo from Vietnam to be placed in our warehouse before transferring them to our buyers in Bintulu, Tawau, and Sandakan.

Empty bag of the new front look of FMP 

Empty bag of the new back view of FMP

Our new FMP front look packaging with contents

Our new FMP back view packaging with contents

The cargo had just arrived from Vietnam 

The process of emptying the container to be shipped to our warehouse begins here

Cargos are being emptied bit by bit

Until it is all transferred

We then transferred them to our warehouse

We then stacked the FMP neatly on the pallets before selling them to our buyers

 

Let us resume our work, palm oil groups urge Sabah govt

KOTA KINABALU: Palm oil groups today urged the Sabah government to consider allowing firms to resume operations for essential procedures such as harvesting, crop evacuation, and milling despite the nationwide movement control order (MCO) which has mostly shut down activity in the country.

In a joint statement, the Malaysian Palm Oil Association and Malaysian Estate Owners Association said there would be social impacts from the closure of operations in the state.

“The industry strongly feels that we can better contain the spread by continuing operations rather than curbing them,” they said.

hey said closing operations only highlights “the operational nightmare” in addition to the potential revenue loss of about RM860 million for a month’s closure in Sabah.

“The loss in 7.5% sales tax revenue to the government amounting to about RM57 million could actually be used to support the fight to contain COVID-19,” they added.

Sabah Chief Minister Shafie Apdal recently announced the closure in phases of palm oil operations in the districts of Tawau, Lahad Datu, and Kinabatangan.

He said this would begin with oil palm plantations before being extended to mills as well.

The three districts account for 65% of the total planted area of 1.2 million hectares and 75% of production in Sabah involving some 100,000 workers.

The groups said these workers would be left idle and confined to their quarters for long hours due to social distancing.

They said the workers might also leave to look for jobs elsewhere or attempt to return to their home countries, which would pose a threat to the MCO objective of containing the spread of COVID-19.

They also said the industry had committed to supporting the government in its battle against the virus by introducing and adhering to guidelines and SOPs at all estates and mills, including a so-called voluntary lockdown.

**Credit: FMT News

**Credit to featured image: freemalaysiatoday.com

Limestone mining in Surabaya

This is the process of mining our Limestone in Surabaya ready to be supplied to our potential buyers.

Limestone being mined in Surabaya

Mining conveyor belt to transport the limestone

Our Limestone mining process video in Surabaya

Malaysia hoping for 40% rise in palm oil imports by Pakistan, says Kok

Picture credit: freemalaysiatoday.com
Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok says the edible oils market is expanding in Pakistan, which has a population of over 200 million.

PUTRAJAYA: Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok hopes Malaysia’s market share for palm oil in Pakistan will increase to up to 60% this year after the republic’s Prime Minister Imran Khan pledged to import more of the commodity

Kok said Malaysian palm oil currently holds a 22% market share in Pakistan.

“There is room for improvement, they are asking for crude palm oil (CPO) at a lower price,” she told a press conference at her ministry here today, adding that detailed discussions would be held to iron out the details.

She said she was happy with Khan’s announcement, describing it as “good news” for Malaysia.

Economists and analysts have cautioned Malaysia against expecting too much from Khan’s pledge because of Pakistan’s lack of money and weak internal demand.

On Tuesday, during a call on Prime Minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad in Putrajaya, Khan said his country would increase imports of palm oil to compensate for Malaysia’s loss in the Indian market.

Asked to comment, Kok said a number of issues could be ironed out through bilateral trade.

During her last visit to Pakistan, she said, there was a request for more direct flights from Karachi to Kuala Lumpur, and there had been an increase in tourists from the country. “So, there is a potential increase in bilateral trade.”

She said there was room for the edible oils market in Pakistan to grow as it had a population of over 200 million that grew at 2.74% every year.

At the same time, she said Malaysia wished to maintain its good relationship with India and explore new markets for the country’s palm oil.

Earlier, Kok announced that the Malaysia-China Silk Route Chamber had donated 3.75 million pieces of gloves and 20,000 pieces of protective clothing for medical use by China which has been hit by the coronavirus outbreak.

The Malaysian Rubber Export Promotion Council and local rubber glove manufacturers had also sent 18 million medical gloves to healthcare workers in Wuhan, China, previously.

The new batch of gloves and protective clothing will be sent to other affected provinces – Hunan, Hubei, Hainan, Shandong and Guangdong.

Also present were Malaysia-China Silk Route Chamber chairman Ong Tee Keat and Chinese embassy spokesman Tang Tang.

Credit: Robin Augustin of FMT news | February 7, 2020

Minister: Malaysia, Pakistan to extend cooperation in palm oil trade

A worker shows palm oil fruits at a factory in Sepang November 20, 2014. — AFP pic
Credit to Malay Mail: A worker shows palm oil fruits at a factory in Sepang November 20, 2014. — AFP pic

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 12 — Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok’s visit to Pakistan has unearthed strong potential for Malaysia and the South Asian nation to cooperate further in palm oil trade as well as other commodities, her ministry said.

The Primary Industries Ministry said Kok and Pakistan’s Advisor for Commerce, Textile, Industry and Production and Investment Abdul Razak Dawood had a four-eye meeting over common interests for the two nations.

“The two leaders took the opportunity for bilateral dialogue to explore various issues of common interest to both countries. Both emphasised the excellent cordial bilateral relations and further explored areas for enhancing trade.

“Pakistan is a key importer of Malaysian palm oil and products. In 2018, Pakistan imported 1.16 million metric tonnes (MT) of palm oil from Malaysia valued at US$0.83 billion (RM2.97 billion). Avenues to further expand Malaysian palm oil share in this growing market was also discussed.

“For example, Pakistan is a net exporter of rice, fruit and other produce that are required by Malaysia and Abdul Razak Dawood encouraged Malaysia to consider instituting trading practices that could allow smoother passage of these products into Malaysia,” said the statement.

During her keynote address at the 5th Pakistan Edible Oil Conference (PEOC) in Karachi, Kok highlighted the importance of Pakistan as an end-user of Malaysian palm oil, facilitated by the joint venture refinery between Malaysia and Pakistan in Port Qasim.

She also described Pakistan as one of Malaysia’s most regular and dependable buyers of local palm oil and products.

She emphasised that palm oil has the potential for higher uptake in Pakistan given that its local production of oils and fats meets only around 20 per cent of its consumption needs.

It depends heavily on imports to meet growing domestic demand and consumption, which has been increasing at a rate of 4.5 per cent each year for the past seven years, due to increasing population, income and consumer spending.

Palm oil is widely used for the manufacture of vanaspati (ghee) and it is also the preferred raw material for the food industry in Pakistan, especially for frying and in confectionery items.

At the same time, during her discussion with Abdul Razak, Kok pointed out that Medium Density Fibreboard (MDF) exporters from Sri Lanka enjoyed lower duties whereas Malaysia’s higher quality MDF were subjected to higher import tariffs.

“Other product opportunities were also discussed and both leaders agreed to convey these matters to the concerned authorities in their respective countries so that solutions could be worked out to benefit better trade relations between Malaysia and Pakistan,” said the statement

Credit to: Malay Mail | Sunday, 12 Jan 2020 09:08 AM MYT | BY AZRIL ANNUAR

Palm Oil’s Changing Fortunes Signal Brighter Outlook in 2020

The tide appears to have turned for the world’s most-consumed edible oil.

Just five months ago, benchmark futures in Malaysia languished at four-year lows as investors fretted about stubbornly high stockpiles, waning demand from top buyers India and China and European restrictions that linked palm oil to environmental harm. Then in October, a trade spat between No. 2 producer Malaysia and India threatened to further hit sales and prices.

That all changed at an industry conference in Bali, where top analysts warned that dry weather and haze will hurt production, just as Indonesia focuses on implementing an ambitious, compulsory biofuel program, which is making the country the world’s biggest user of palm oil as well as the largest supplier.

That gave another leg-up to prices, extending the rally from the July low by 50% to more than 2,900 ringgit ($700) a ton and putting the market on track for a 35% gain this year, its best performance in almost a decade, reversing planter fortunes. By contrast, soybean oil is up 22% this year. So what’s next?

Palm oil prices have rallied to hover near a 3-year high

Most industry players see prices of the oil, used in everything from chocolate to shampoo and biofuel, staying at elevated levels in 2020. Benchmark futures may average 2,600 ringgit a ton, the highest in three years, according to the median of 25 estimates in a Bloomberg survey of analysts, traders and plantation executives, versus an average of 2,240 ringgit this year.

“Lower production at origins, increasing biodiesel mandates and robust food demand would be the key price drivers next year,” said Anilkumar Bagani, research head of Sunvin Group, a Mumbai-based broker and consultant.

Here’s what industry participants are watching:

1. Biofuel Boom

Indonesia’s B30 biofuel mandate is key to palm oil’s price direction. The policy “will help increase crude palm oil prices, improve plantations’ finances and help to channel biodiesel into the domestic market,” said Sathia Varqa, owner of Palm Oil Analytics in Singapore.

But biofuel mandates in Indonesia and Malaysia are facing scrutiny, especially as palm oil trades at a fat premium of almost $100 a ton to gas oil, compared with an average discount of $54 in the past year. That makes palm more expensive to blend into biofuel and requires increased financial incentives. The industry is watching whether Indonesia reimposes export levies to fund the mandate. That’s more likely now that No. 2 grower Malaysia is set to hike its own export duty from January. “Any failure to fulfil the mandate can have a negative impact on prices,” Varqa said.

Palm oil is the most expensive relative to gasoil since 2017

2. Weak Production

Analysts are trimming their outlook for production in Indonesia and Malaysia due to dry weather and lack of fertilizer application spilling into 2020. LMC International Chairman James Fry forecasts global palm stockpiles to shrink next year as slow output growth coincides with a boost to biodiesel mandates. What’s more, relentless pressure from NGOs to stop oil palm planting, as well as the slowdown in new planting due to low prices earlier, will inevitably keep production growth low in the next few years, Fry said in November. Industry watchers will be monitoring fresh fruit bunches to gauge production trends in the coming months, especially if there are signs of an uptick in yields.

Indonesia, Malaysia palm oil output growth in focus

3. Demand Buoyant

The rally has been so fierce it threatens the oil’s traditional role as cheap vegetable oil for food and fuel. Palm hit parity with soybean oil for the first time since 2011, reducing its appeal versus other oils and prompting buyers to turn to alternatives. While a politically fueled trade spat between Malaysia and India fizzled in November, traders will wait to see whether this key customer may look to hike import duties, which could curb palm purchases.

China, meanwhile, has upped its buying since July as African swine fever slashed hog herds and lowered domestic demand for soybean meal, meaning fewer beans are crushed and less oil produced. China National Grain and Oils Information Center expects palm oil imports to reach a record of 7 million tons in the year starting October, as the tropical oil fills the gap.

High prices may cut palm oil demand

4. Going Green, Weather Watch

Industry efforts to be more sustainable and avoid being dubbed a climate villain will become more important in 2020, especially since it could lead to more companies or countries restricting the use of palm. There are fears that the EU, which wants to phase out palm use in biofuel, may look to food next. Malaysia has warned that the bloc’s proposed limits on 3-MCPD esters may impact palm’s usage in food products and is looking into enforcing regulations to meet acceptable safety levels of the food processing contaminant. National sustainable certification schemes in Malaysia and Indonesia will become mandatory for growers next year, even as a producing-countries band together to fight what they call discriminatory measures against the palm.

Meanwhile, weather calamities that affect soybean crops in the U.S. and South America, or sunflower in the Black Sea countries could tighten supplies and lift edible oil prices including palm.

 Updated on 
Bloomberg
Credit Picture: Sanjit Das of Bloomberg